March 4, 2013

Flash Blog: Technology

Popular technology creates artificial connection, frequently while imposing an impenetrable barrier between any individual and the outside world.

It is all too easy to blame our technology for this dissociation, though it predominately exists to improve our lives.  Technology augments quality of life at home and in the workplace, literally saves lives, and affords opportunities for growth our predecessors could not even dream of – though they tried.   It's our fault that we simply hide behind it. 

Blaming technology for our own shortcomings has become a crutch for many of us.  Wouldn't you rather stand on your own two feet?  


* The first draft of this post was significantly longer, but in trying to keep with  the "Flash" part of the challenge I trimmed it down.  Perhaps I will revisit this topic later on!

14 comments :

  1. We used to know the name of the waitress in the diner, now we have drive-thru windows. We used to visit with the teller when we went to the bank, now it's an ATM machine. And, in many instances, we're 'checking' our own purchases at the grocery and/or department stores.

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    1. But we don't have to! We can choose to go to family-owned restaurants where we (can get to) know the chef or the waiters, and to talk to the teller (though my bank would literally charge me for that), or go through a normal check-out lane. We could use technology to communicate for the sake of planning gatherings (or joining communities like with BlogFlash!) rather than to communicate without, say, having to get dressed. Technology, I think, can and should be used to provide options, not to limit us.

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  2. I agree the technology isn't to blame. It's how we use it.

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  3. That's an interesting entry, this is something that we users of technology should be aware of. We need to be responsible for what we are doing when it comes to technology.

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  4. If it means never having to actually set foot in a high school reunion, then I am happy to hide lol. I would definitely love to see how you expound on this if you do get a chance to revisit later!

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    1. I haven't been to a high school reunion, so I'll take your word for it haha. Thanks for the interest, Jenny - I'll have to make sure to do a full-fledged post; I'll try not to disappoint!

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  5. I used to hate the idea of texting because I felt that it fell into that arena. It seemed so impersonal. I do use it now, but it is for the sake of time when I need to get a quick message through but do not have time to talk. I would still rather talk to someone and hear their voice as opposed to texting if time allows. :)

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    1. It's incredible how quickly we become accustomed to 'simplifying' behaviors like that, isn't it? I refuse to buy a smart phone, and I even have a limited texting plan to keep myself more used to calling people and having vocal conversations (since when I'm at the computer, I obviously find one chat mechanism or another indispensable..). ;-)

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  6. Great post

    I hated computers and resisted getting one for many years, then got given one 4 years ago and you can't get me off it lol

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    1. Thanks, Dawn! I think there's a reason they market these things as "notebooks" - it's to sucker in all us writers ;-)

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  7. I certainly try not to blame technology. Every now and then IT is the culprit. Like when I try to load a third blog and whole window crashes. However, I don't blame it for not calling my sister or mother. That's my fault and something I have to own up to.

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    1. On the plus side, you can use technology to remind yourself to call your sister or mother ;-)

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  8. Very thought-provoking! It is easy to blame technology but it is up to us to try and moderate how much it disconnects us.

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    1. Yep! Technology should work for us not the other way around.

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